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About AllEarth Rail

Mission

AllEarth Rail’s mission is to acquire and operate commuter and regional passenger railroad assets that will enable it to work with existing public and private transportation services to provide safe, reliable and cost-effective passenger service between Vermont's cities and towns, resorts, hospitals, colleges and universities.

Increasing frequency will provide new options for commuters, while expanding the routes of Vermont's two Amtrak trains, the Ethan Allen and the Vermonter, will give travelers options for many new adventures.

Expanding Passenger Rail Service the Vermont Way

Vermont has a long history and tradition of thoughtful environmental conservation and innovative, practical solutions to sustainably support the people and communities in our small, rural state.

History of Conservation

The Marsh – Billings – Rockefeller National Historic Park chronicles and demonstrates Vermont’s more than 150 years of conservation leadership and practice. A managed forest and LEED platinum center, working dairy farm, and a historic home host education classes and interpretive tours on sustainability and climate change response year round.

Practical Solutions

Vermont’s small scale fosters opportunities for individuals and businesses to create a meaningful impact by creating or adapting solutions to work in a small, rural state with limited resources.

Faced with the challenge of balancing Vermont’s goal of significantly reducing the carbon emissions associated with vehicle miles traveled with an unrealistic and unaffordable estimate of $300+ million to expand passenger rail service using traditional, long-haul locomotive engines and reliance on public funding, AllEarth Rail chose to invest in a fleet of the classic, self-propelled, Budd stainless steel railcars designed for rural passenger rail service.

The Budd rail cars offer flexibility, low operating costs, and reliability for the short-haul passenger rail service so needed in Vermont.

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